High Performance Cut Resistant Gloves (Uncoated Models)

In this post I will discuss “Uncoated” Cut Resistant Gloves. I think it is important to distinguish uncoated cut resistant gloves from coated cut resistant gloves for several reasons. I’ll cover the differences as I discuss the features.

Although you can conclude from my previous discussions that I’m a big fan of coated cut resistant gloves, uncoated models are very appropriate for many uses and indications requiring safety cut resistant situations.

Largest demand for uncoated cut resistant gloves:

The largest demand for uncoated cut resistant gloves is in the food service industry where the need for enhanced gripping is not required. I know many of you will initially think the need for grip is needed due to the sharp knives used but this is not the case. For those of you familiar with the food industry and particularly butchers, you will always see a butcher wearing only “one” glove. These gloves are always cut resistant models. The hand usually without a glove is referred to as the knife hand which meat and poultry cutters prefer in order to maintain better control of the knives. As you can imagine, gloves can diminish the intricate control of the knife and this hand does not need any cut protection. On the other hand, the actual piece of food does not require any special gripping. This hand only requires the use of a disposable glove to protect from any cross-contamination from someone’s hand.

Uncoated Cut Resistant gloves are not limited to the food service industry by any means. They are widely popular in uses such as the fishing industry, oyster shucking, sheet metal handling, canning, and other industrial applications. Uncoated cut resistant gloves are normally easier to clean and sterilize and are not prone to breakdown due to harsh chemicals.

Uncoated Cut Resistant Gloves are ambidextrous:

Another interesting aspect of uncoated cut resistant gloves is that they are ambidextrous meaning they can be worn on either hand. This cannot be accomplished with a coated cut resistant glove due to the coating on one side or the palm side.  

This ambidextrous feature can also extend the wear life of the gloves which can also reduce costs.

ANSI Cut Level of Uncoated Gloves

You will find that uncoated cut resistant gloves come in all levels of cut resistance. To save reading time and repetition on this topic, you can find other references on this issue in other posts. Just type in ANSI Cut Level in the search area of this blog and you will find plenty of references on this issue.

Uncoated Cut Resistant Glove Fibers:

You will find the same type of fibers in both the coated cut resistant gloves as well as the uncoated models. However, you will find a few antimicrobial uncoated models that use a special blended antimicrobial fiber with the cut resistant fiber. This feature is easier to accomplish with uncoated models since coatings are difficult to be made antimicrobial and coatings can also block the antimicrobial feature of the fiber in the gloves.

Pricing:

You will not find any significant difference in prices verses the coated and uncoated models. Pricing is largely reflected by the fiber used and since both types use the same fibers, pricing will be similar. The coatings themselves are fairly inexpensive and are applied using machines.

Examples of Various Uncoated Cut Resistant Gloves:

Below are a few examples of our most popular uncoated cut resistant gloves. I am not going to bore you by listing all of these uncoated cut resistant gloves here in this post, so I think listing the most popular is a better approach. You will find a link to all of our cut resistant gloves below if needed.

Also, I will only include a few important bullet points with each example and you can review a more detailed description by clicking on the links.

Please note that the examples listed are approved for direct and indirect food handling.

Wells Lamont Whizard Stainless Steel Metal Mesh Gloves

Micro-plasma welded 4 mm rings have no gaps to trap soil that can feed bacterial growth.

  • Ambidextrous
  • Available in 3 Wrist Lengths and 7 sizes for men and women.

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Kut Gard Dyneema Antimicrobial Cut Resistant Gloves

  • Antimicrobial Fiber
  • Ambidextrous
  • 13 Gauge Seamless Thin Knit
  • ANSI Cut Level 5

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Kut Gard Dyneema/Lycra Seamless Knit Cut Resistant Gloves

  • Ambidextrous
  • Softer and more flexible 13 Gauge Seamless Thin Knit 
  • ANSI Cut Level 2

Link to Cut Resistant Gloves

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The Glove Guru – Joe McGarry

Why I generally suggest Coated Cut Resistant Gloves over uncoated versions

As many of you may already know that I am very partial to coated cut resistant gloves. However, I wanted to substantiate my position on the matter from a technical and practical perspective.

First, I should emphasize and disclose that I also highly endorse uncoated cut resistant gloves for special uses. One ideal example would be cut resistant gloves used for safety purposes in the food services and food handling sectors. These would be uncoated gloves like the extraordinary Wells Lamont Whizard Stainless Steel Mesh Cut-Resistant Gloves and the PIP Kut Gard Seamless Knit Dyneema Cut Resistant Gloves. Therefore, I will discuss these further in another new Glove Guru Blog post.

Thinness and Cut Resistance

As I have previously discussed in other posts, Coated Cut Resistant Gloves have vastly improved in recent years. Not only have they become exceptionally thin, the level of cut resistance has become remarkably very high. These two advantages alone make an impressive case to support and recommend their use in most applications requiring safe cut resistant protection.

Gripping

The other main and very important advantage of the coated versions is the superior grip over uncoated models. Gripping is a major factor in safety gloves, especially when it includes cut resistance.

ANSI Cut Resistance Levels

Since I often refer to the ANSI level of cut resistance, for those of you not familiar with this EN388 standard, you can refer to my post which explains this standard and the newer rating symbols.

EN388 link: ANSI STANDARD

You will need to familiarize yourself with the various ratings in order to purchase cut resistant gloves for your particular application. The new ratings refer to ANSI Cut Levels A1 to A9. The most popular gloves are usually A2 to A4 (A4 being a higher cut resistance). When you are looking to purchase a new pair of cut-resistant gloves, we make it easy for you to locate a glove with the rating you prefer. Simply type in the rating number in our site search box at the top of our Home page and we will display all the gloves with that rating. It’s that easy. For example: Type in A4 in the search box and all of the ANSI Cut Level A4 gloves will display for you.

Pricing

Regarding pricing, it should be obvious to everyone that the higher the price, the higher the level of cut resistance. This is largely due to the fiber being more expensive to make or with the blend of other fibers such as stainless steel. The old axiom of “you get what you pay for” applies here, too.

Coatings

Regarding coatings, Nitrile Coated Cut Resistant Gloves are the most popular since Nitrile is a very durable latex rubber free polymer and it is also resistance to most chemicals. Polyurethane is an excellent coating like Nitrile but not as popular due to the complexities in manufacturing the PU polymer. Plus PU coatings tend to be more expensive.

I personally like polyurethanes over nitrile coatings since they are also biocompatible and just as strong and resistant to chemicals.

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Some Glove examples:

One of popular A4 models is the #WK-CC470 ATG Nitrile Coated Dyneema Maxicut Cut Resistant Gloves (19-D470).

The 470 model is very form-fitting and very durable. Most users purchase these since they have a long-life and the cut resistance is very respectable.

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Another popular A3 model is the #WK-CC3745 ATG MaxiCut Ultra, Cut Resistant Micro-Foam Nitrile Coated Gloves (44-3745)

The 3745 is another example of a nice form-fitting glove and they also comply with FDA food handling requirements 21 CFR, Part 177.

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An A3 model that we’ve sold since 2008 is the #WK-CC322 GREAT WHITE™ Dyneema®/Lycra® Polyurethane Coated Cut Resistant Gloves (19-D322)

This model has an A3 ANSI Cut Level. This glove is particularly unique since it has a Dyneema/Lycra blend with a polyurethane coating. The Lycra offers a bit more comfort in the fit and polyurethane coatings are as durable and chemical resistant as nitrile. They just aren’t as popular since the polyurethane coating is very difficult to make and manufacture.

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A popular A2 model is the #WK-CC8743 ATG Maxiflex Cut, Cut Resistant Micro-Foam Nitrile Coated Gloves (34-8743)

The 8743 is not as cut resistant as the above models but an A2 rating is fairly good for most applications and this model is less expensive. This model also complies with the FDA food handling requirements 21 CFR, Part 177.

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These are just a few examples of our coated cut-resistant models. To see our entire line of cut resistant gloves, go to this link:

Cut Resistant Gloves

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To see our entire line up of Coated Work Gloves, go to this link:

Coated Work Gloves

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Thanks for subscribing to my blog and thank you for your continued business.

Joe McGarry

The GLOVE GURU since 1989

Another new Coated Cut Resistant Glove

As I have previously discussed, the Coated Work Glove category continues to expand for very good reasons. You can check my previous posts so I won’t belabor that issue in this particular post.

This week, we added another new glove to the coated work glove category and this one is a new Thin Cut Resistant model. The coated cut resistant line-up continues to expand for obvious reasons. Their durable, light-weight, offer high dexterity which adds to the safety aspect, and the pricing is becoming very reasonable.

See the new G-Tek Polykor X7 seamless knit with a double dip full nitrile coating and micro-surface grip. Model 16-939. Our listing WK-CC939.

G-Tek Polykor X7 Gloves 16-939

The Polykor blended shell is a proprietary cut resistant fiber that was invented by the PIP group to circumvent the more expensive branded cut resistant fibers which reduces the costs but not the cut resistant performance.

An interesting aspect to me is that the shell is an 18 gauge seamless knit which makes them even thinner than the typical 13 or 15 gauge knits. I doubt many will notice this at first, but this represents a major accomplishment when considering this model is cut resistant as well.  

They are double dipped with a full coating to maintain dry hands in any wet or oily environment.

The Nitrile coating, as most know, is one of the most durable and chemical resistant and the micro surface provides outstanding grip by acting as tiny suction cups.

The other attributes are that they are washable, and resistant to chemicals, water, and UV light.

They are ANSI Cut Level A3 with an EN388 Rating of 4X42C.

Uses include:

Finishing & Inspection, Electronics, General Duty, Small parts assembly, Construction, and Maintenance.

Coated Cut Resistant Gloves

Coated Cut Resistant Glove with knife

Coated Cut Resistant Gloves

I’ve covered coated work gloves in the past but this post is focused specifically on coated cut-resistant gloves.

Most workers know about traditional cut-resistant gloves such as the old Kevlar thick knits used in factories or the super metal mesh gloves worn by butchers. However, the most prevalent today are the thin knit coated cut-resistant gloves that are popular since they are thin, seamless, and very flexible which adds additional elements of safety.
The uses by our customers are very diverse numerous but I’ll provide the most popular uses that are known to us. I list them since it is a good reference guide for new customers.

Uses include:

Automotive; construction; electronics; fishing industries; glass cutting; glass industry; metal stamping; parts assembly; sharp parts handling; recycling; sanitation; sheet metal handling; and waste handling.

Due to the many uses that I just mentioned, there are specific coated cut-resistant gloves designed for these particular uses. Examples include general duty construction and work gloves; liquid proof models, and even chemical resistant versions. This is why we carry 9 different coated cut-resistant gloves just for these uses. Rather than provide 9 separate links in this post, it would be much easier for you to find a model that meets your use in the following links.

Since coated cut-resistant gloves have different levels of cut resistance, you may find the following link on the new EN388 Cut Resistant Standard helpful. We show cut resistant levels in each of our glove listings.

Understanding the new Glove Cut Resistant EN 388 Standard

Many of you who use Cut Resistant gloves will begin to see the new markings relating to the new standards on the gloves they use. They can be a bit confusing at first but they are simply more precise as to the mechanical risk.

To make them easier to understand, we have loaded a printable PDF file on our web site that you can print out. This file is compliments of the technical people at the PIP Glove Company.

Regarding the cut resistance, most gloves in the old 3, 4, and 5 ranges remain almost the same but with a new A3, A4, and A5 symbols. I mention these ranges since most of the popular cut resistant gloves fall in these ranges.

Link: New EN 388 Standard

Link: Cut Resistant Gloves

Updated EN 388 Standard for Protective Gloves


https://www.gloves-online.com/catalog/cut-resistant-gloves
The European Standard for Protective Gloves, EN 388, was updated on November 2, 2016 and is now in the process of being ratified by each member country. Glove manufacturers selling in Europe, have two years to comply with the new EN 388 2016 standard. Regardless of this allotted adjustment period, many leading manufacturers will immediately start using revised markings on gloves. Therefore, we thought it would be wise to provide this information now to help avoid any confusion. 
The good thing is that the new markings will include the old markings with the added two new testing results added at the end for the new TDM-100 Cut test and the new Impact Protection test. 
Unless someone can convince me otherwise, I have found that the old EN 388 standard and markings provided an excellent guide for our customers in the USA.  However, for the sake of proper technical information I have provided both markings as a guide. 
As far as impact protection (the last letter), it is a simple P for Passed; F for Failed; or X for Not Tested. 

Glove Guru Blog is rich in glove content


Looking back to 2008 when I started the glove guru blog I didn’t realize the real value that it brings today to our customers old and new. Unlike a collection of news stories and magazine articles posted on our website (which we have), the glove blog brings a wealth of glove information all in one place and remains a permanent archive of old and new posts. It also contains links to external glove information. 
Most people overlook the value of a good blog until they are searching for answer to a question about glove not easily found. It may not seem like a high number but about 30 people a day search our glove blog looking for specific information. My bet is that if you were one of those 30 people and you found what you were looking for, you were very happy you found the blog. 
The blog contains title tags in a right hand navigation bar which can lead you directly to a specific category post or you can use the search bar for other specific glove content. In all, it remains a gold mine of good glove content. 
Examples of popular posts are:
Obviously, not all of the posts are technical or data rich since we do share some fun glove stuff and even some celebrity glove information. 
As a footnote, if you have a glove question and you cannot find an answer on the glove blog, please let us know. Most of the content is usually the result of phone calls from our customers so you will be helping others if you let us  know. 

Caviar meets Metal Mesh Gloves

It’s always fun to learn more about our customers and their uses and yesterday,

I was able to assist one with a special request for a special event. They needed a few pair of our famous Whizard Stainless Steel Metal Mesh gloves but they needed them the next day.  Unfortunately, we were out of stock on the size they needed but fortunately, my reliable colleague at Wells Lamont Industrial, Pat, came through at the very end of their work day and had them shipped overnight for us. He saved the day and the show.

Whizard Metal Mesh Gloves

What’s interesting is the various types of customers that use our gloves. This one is Caviar & Caviar in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. They are a gourmet purveyor of caviar and salmon products. They also feature a web site for on-line orders. Check them out. 
http://www.caviarmerchant.com/index.php/
I’m not surprised that Caviar & Caviar deal in delicacies and use the SS Metal Mesh gloves – these gloves are the ultimate delicacy in cut resistance in food processing. 

Whizard Stainless Steel Metal Mesh Cut Resistant Gloves

http://www.gloves-online.com/whizard-stainless-steel-metal-mesh-gloves


We’ve sold these gloves for over a decade now and they remain one of our most popular cut resistant gloves – and when I say cut resistant, there is no glove that is absolutely cut resistant like these. This is why many professionals in the food service industries among other industries turn to these gloves as the finale safety remedy. 
We stock three (3) versions in sizes from XXS to XXL and they are ambidextrous. 
Read more about these gloves at the following link: